Monday, July 29, 2013

IF I’D NEVER HEARD OF ME WOULD I READ MY BOOK? ~ Guest blog

If I’d never heard of me, would I read my book? Probably not. I am like every new writer, working hard to get his or her name before the masses. It is not easy to win over the trust of someone and offer your book, which will actually take time out of their lives to read. They will invest whole hours on your fiction, on your characters, on your story, hoping to find some sort of satisfaction in reading it. This takes time, and people are so short on time these days, and that’s why they take shortcuts. That’s why many people will read a bestselling author that they have never read before, because as my mother would say: “Three thousand Frenchmen cant’ be wrong.”
So new writers have it tough finding loyal eyes to go over their work and now, with the advent of indie-publishing, this will no doubt get harder and harder as more and more thousands of books become available to the reading audience. Soon there will be more books coming out in a year than there are readers. How does an avid reader pick their next book?
No doubt through some shrewd marketing. A writer has to get their novel out there, and before the right people and in the right places. All of these things that involve marketing seem to be more like magic and sleight of hand to me than any kind of science. All I can do is write the best story that I can, hopefully grab the reader’s attention and satisfy their reading desires so that they will tell a friend or two about my book. I still think word of mouth is the best advertising.
If I saw my book on the shelf, with its interesting cover, I think I would pause and read the back and since it’s a story about a genre that I like, I think I might give it a chance. But there are so many factors in choosing a book to read.

I hope that, even in spite of myself, I meet them all.


BLURB:  

A high profile murder of a Wall Street executive in Westchester pits three people against the criminal underbelly of Manhattan nightlife. The key players are two ex-cops turned private investigators—Kevin Whitehouse, whose sharpest tool is his keen analytical mind, and David Allerton, a former Special Forces operative—and Margaret Alexander, Kevin’s lover. In their search for a killer, they are forced to travel to the edge of sanity and morality, while stumbling onto their own confusing secrets as well. The Cover of Darkness is a gritty noir saga that untangles a web of deceit in the course of tracking down a brutal murderer.



EXCERPT 

The pool area was wide and reflected the sun on this hot summer day. It was edged with white marble so polished that it looked like pearl. Deck chairs lined the sides of the long pool, which was two lengths more than Olympic-sized. Outside the deck area was the carpeted lawn of the vast backyard, dappled with sun.

Hugh Osterman walked along the side of the pool wearing a heavy terry cloth robe and sandals. In his right hand, he held a martini glass. He ran his left hand through his sandy sun-streaked hair as he looked over his shoulder at the man following him.

“What’s going on? I don’t get it,” Osterman said, stopping at the end of the pool where the flotation chairs were kept.

“They said no,” the man replied. Considering the backdrop, he was incongruously dressed in a dark suit and tie.

“They said no . . . just like that?”

Osterman sat his drink down on the marble surface, and pushed a flotation chair into the deep end of the pool, sending it out and away. Then he peeled off the robe and dove smoothly into the water, emerging next to the floating chair.

“You go back and tell them that we aren’t pleased,” Osterman said sternly, pulling himself up and into the seat of the chair. “You tell them that Hugh Osterman wants to know what’s holding things up—what the problem is.”

The suit just stood at the edge of the pool, opening his jacket against the heat of the day. Osterman paddled to the side, and reached out and retrieved his martini glass. “I take it you have nothing to say about this?” he persisted, despite the other man’s silence.

The suit shook his head.

“Well, what are you waiting for?” Osterman said as he tipped the glass up to his lips. Suddenly, the bottom of the stem shattered. Osterman gurgled as he dropped the glass, blood bubbling from his mouth, an open tear in his neck. He jolted upright in the chair as the suit closed the distance between them, his Colt .38 Super still trained on its victim, its silencer smoldering.

Osterman slowly sat back as the suit pumped more rounds into Osterman’s bare, well-defined chest—the hot shells of his pistol ejecting out and striking the surface of the water, settling to the bottom. His life ended as his body tumbled from the floating chair, his blood a widening crimson slick roughly in the area where his body slipped through.

The suit popped his clip, slipped in a new one, and headed for the sprawling house.

AUTHOR INFORMATION:

Gregory Delaurentis spent his adult life roaming from job to job, working for Lockheed in California, various law firms in New York, and financial firms on Wall Street. Throughout this period of time, he was writing—unceasingly—finally producing a large body of work, albeit unrecognized and unpublished . . . until now. Cover of Darkness is the first in a series of upcoming books that include Edge of Darkness, Pale of Darkness and Cries of Darkness. These novels follow the lives of three individuals who do battle bringing criminals to justice, while they struggle to understand the complex relationships that exist among themselves. This intriguing trio has absorbed the attention of Mr. Delaurentis for the past year and a half, so much so he decided to self-publish their stories to bring them to a wider audience. [AUTHORS DISCLAIMER: These are works of fiction. Name, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.]
LINKS
Vendor links


General links
4) http://gregorydelaurentis.blogspot.com/

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33 comments:

  1. Hello, I would like to thank Charity Parkerson for hosting my book and I would like to thank all of the commenters that participate. I am here today to answer any questions posed and I have a question to any who participate: Just a personal question, what do you like more? Hardcore fiction like Mickey Spillane, or Soft Core thrillers, like Agatha Christie?

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  2. Just asking that question "IF I’D NEVER HEARD OF ME WOULD I READ MY BOOK?" puts you on the right track. This is what all writers need to think about if they're going to get noticed.

    I'd follow that question up with, "Why the F*CK would I read this book?" Because coming up with solid answers to THAT question is what marketing is all about.

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    1. You're absolutely right, Ms. Caffrey. The truth is that a good marketing plan will get a reader past the cover and the name of the author. That is the key to marketing and marketing well. But marketing is so filled with choices and avenues, some very expensive, some cheap, that it's very easy to make a mistake that has so little return. Whatever the case though, that's what marketing, and that's what a good blog tour, is all about. :)

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  3. I tend to go for more soft core thrillers but I am really open. I think there are great books worth discovering in every gendre. I think it is a cover than would intrigue me to pick it up though really book blogs are what sell me on trying a new author

    fencingromein at hotmail dot com

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    1. Thank you Ms. R. So a blog tour is what really helps people to make a decision. I feel better about my decision to do this now.

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  4. The book sounds like a very intriguing read.

    Kit3247(at)aol(dot)com

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    2. Thank you Ingeborg, if you purchase it, I hope you enjoy it.

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  5. Amazon for sure! Thanks for sharing!

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  6. All writers have to start some place, but you ask a very good ? and give us all food for thought!

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  7. Best of luck with the release (and Amazon for me if I win). I like either genre, as long as it's not too gory and visceral...

    vitajex(at)aol(dot)com

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    1. Good luck to you too, vitajex and thank you.

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  8. Thanks for stopping by everyone. :-D

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    1. Thank you Ms Parkerson, I had a wonderful time today. :)

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  9. As a librarian, I can tell you that it's easier now for an indie author to get a start than it has been in the past. The whole "long tail" theory speaks to that. But without reviews in standard review sources, it can still be very difficult for indie authors to get their books onto library shelves.
    I'm an Amazon girl!
    catherinelee100 at gmail dot com

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    1. I agree, Amazon has indeed leveled the playing field, and because of Amazon reviews many new writers are given a chance where at one time their books would never move. I don't know the reason why standard review sources still discriminate against indie-published books, but without their aid, everything will still be an upward climb for many new authors. I haven't tried to get my book onto library shelves, but that might be a goal, when it develops fully, later on down the road. Do you see any obstacles in getting an indie book on the shelves of popular libraries?

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  10. I would like to thank everyone that commented today. I really enjoyed your replies. Have a wonderful evening and a bright tomorrow.

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  11. This is where book blog tours are so great. I've found some amazing authors this way.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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    1. Ms Preston,
      Actually this is my very first blog tour and I find it exciting to be able to talk to people about issues, the book, and what they think about writers. I guess what I'm trying to say is that I think that blog tours are great too.

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  12. Good morning everyone. I'm glad to be back today to answer any questions that you may have.

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  13. Great question. One every author, whether traditional or indie published, needs to ask.

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    1. Thank you Ms. Lynne and thank you for dropping by.

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  15. That's why book blurbs and reviews and blog tours are so important. It's convincing people that what you found intriguing as you were writing will be just as intriguing to them as a reader. Great question!

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  16. I agree Ms. Remington, this is my first blog tour, and I have to say, I'm a complete newbie about it, but even now I can see it's importance when it comes to connecting writers to their readers. Thanks for coming by and participating.

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  17. I stumbled across this while catching up on a fellow blogging friend's (Patricia Lynne) posts. This is a fairly interesting question to pose.

    Honestly, I almost think it's one every writer should ask themselves (I know I will be now!), because if at the end of the day you don't think you would, it's possible there is more work to be done, whether editing/excerpt selection/marketing/etc etc - I believe all factor into one's decision to buy a book and not necessarily just the writing. I'd say cover, but I'm learning more and more that covers seem out of the writer's hand for the most part. though, I've been told with a good agent you can fight for a new selection if very displeased with one.

    I'm in the infancy stages of getting back to writing (Nov 2012 after 12 year... "hiatus"), but haven't written any fiction since March. I'm my own worse critic (as we all seem to be), but I'd like to think that I would actually buy my book that I have planned. This is based on the fact I am trying to write a story I know I'd like/want to read, and if others enjoy the same all the better. But you know what they say about good intentions...

    So this has me pondering (and difficult in a self reflective manner as I'm no where near completing my WIP), when all is said and done if I would be prone to snap up my own book. Covers and Titles really appeal to me, but I do agree word of mouth is the best form of advertisement. I plan to go down swinging with that belief if I have to!

    Good luck with your book release! My only "critique" if wanting to call it that is being bummed it sounds (from the "about" section - I liked the excerpt) that all main characters survive throughout the trilogy, and while it may be predictable given a lower character count... 3+ brings me closer to a level of understanding the possibility that one of them may not be making it home alive ;-) If that makes any sense haha

    Great guest blog post, sorry I showed up late to the party, but it's my curse!

    Jak at The Cryton Chronicles & Dreams in the Shade of Ink

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    1. Thank you for replying Jak. Your take on more work being done in the selection/marketing area is on target in my book, that's if my book means anything. I've come to realize that marketing a book is a full time job. You have to be at it constantly, and it begins with the cover. A reader will make numerous decisions concerning your book within seconds of picking it up. The title, the cover, the name of the author, the first few paragraphs, etc. And then, by extension, how you've marketed it to them. I didn't know that being a writer was just one side of the coin, and now, to get people interested in my book is the other. It takes a lot. And, what I feel is the Holy Grail of every marketing plan: good word of mouth, or as some call it, 'going viral' when it's on the Internet is a definite plus. Just how one goes about getting that is a great mystery to me. I can only hope that whatever confluence of factors that come together to make it happen, does.

      Anyway, I wish you much success Jak with your writing, and retaking the reins after a 12 year break. But you'll find it to be just like riding a bike. In the beginning you'll be a bit rusty, but it'll all come back to you, you can never forget, and you will find your skill greater. Time and patience are two good things that can happen to a writer.

      Thank you for your comment and thank you for dropping by, as you can see, you are never too late for the party. Have a great day.

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  18. Sorry for the late post. I’m playing catch-up here so I’m just popping in to say HI and sorry I missed visiting with you on party day! Hope you all had a good time!
    kareninnc at gmail dot com

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  19. It's never too late to post :) Thanks for dropping by and have a great day.

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